Artisan Blog

Cool Job Perks

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Cool Job Perks

Whatever you do for a living, you'll be spending a good amount of time on it. Thus, it's important to choose jobs, gigs, and careers that are aligned with your values, your strengths, your goals, as well as with your sense of adventure and fun.

When you're job hunting or looking for a new creative career, simply picking an opportunity with the largest salary attached may not lead to as much happiness as you might be expecting. Take some time to look at the whole picture, including job perks that will make your job and the workplace you’ll be spending 8+ hours a day in uniquely welcoming and rewarding. And, if you run a business and you're hiring talent, consider offering enticing and unusual job perks to help attract the right team that can take your entity to the next level.

Here are a few job perks to consider, from the common to the quirky, to the cool.

Flextime: The ritual of working regular shifts Monday through Friday, 9:00 to 5:00, is based on an old industrial model of workplace efficiency that is not necessarily applicable or useful for all modern businesses. Flextime gives workers and their managers the opportunity to collaborate and create slightly offbeat schedules that may better accommodate the circumstances and needs of everyone involved.

Remote Work: As the capabilities of workplace technology improve exponentially, entirely remote teams will become more and more common. It's how we’ve been working at Artisan Creative since 2009, and for us (and a lot of our clients), it's working quite well.

Unlimited Vacations: American workers are notorious for their relative lack of long vacations, but things may be changing. Some top companies are no longer doling out small allotments of PTO and sick time and are switching to something more like an honor system, granting their employees full freedom to vacation as they will and trusting them to do so responsibly.

Fitness & Health Perks: Many employers are becoming more focused on the overall health and wellness of their talent, providing yoga sessions, bikes and other perks that help them feel good and develop good habits, inside and outside of work.

Dry Cleaning: Hate doing laundry? Need to be spotless and wrinkle-free for client meetings and presentations? Consider a job that will steam your pants and tumble-dry your whites, on the house.

Nap Rooms: Naptime may have felt like punishment in kindergarten. Now as a hardworking adult, you could probably use some R&R on the clock. More companies are providing small sanctuaries for meditation, contemplation, or simply catching a few Zs.

Life Coaching: At Artisan, we believe creating the right career is about aligning all aspects of life to orient yourself toward your true values. So we're entirely in favor of getting a gentle push from a qualified life coach, especially when it's part of your job.

Ax-Throwing Lessons: Then again, some people need more aggressive catharsis than others. If you want to release some tension and be prepared to kill your own food if necessary, there are job perks out there for you, as well.

Together with our top talent and world-class clients, we're helping to shape the workplace of the future. Contact Artisan Creative today and discover better ways to work.

We hope you enjoy the 522nd issue of our a.blog.

 

 


The California Job Market

Wednesday, April 03, 2019

The California Job Market

California is home to the world's fifth-largest economy, worth nearly $3 trillion per year. Much of its economic activity is based around Greater Los Angeles (the entertainment capital of the world) and the San Francisco Bay Area (home base of the tech industry).

If you're building your career in design, technology, or a creative field - or you're launching or expanding a business of your own - which of these two world-class cultural nodes is a better fit for your skills, goals, and temperament?

San Francisco: All Hands on Tech

The Bay Area served as the cradle for the personal computing revolution of the 1970s, the popularization of the World Wide Web in the '90s, and the current dominance of giant Silicon Valley corporations such as Google, Apple, and Facebook in global commerce, communication, and culture. It's the place where engineers and entrepreneurs first fully embraced the world-shifting potential of connected gadgets.

With record-low unemployment and plenty of San Francisco open jobs, designers, developers, marketers, and other tech-savvy creatives are still feeling the love in SF, even as the city deals with staggeringly expensive... well, everything, especially housing. The city has its problems, and it will need its best minds to put their heads together and think up unprecedented solutions - and that’s what the Bay does best.

Fresh opportunities arise at the intersections of tech with other emerging fields, and the tight-knit cultural communities of SF are ideal for the formation of these sorts of symbiotic relationships.

"The Bay Area has a history of bohemianism and sophistication that is now melding with a technology-driven culture," says author and economic geographer Michael Storper, in conversation with urban studies theorist Richard Florida. "One hopes that the Bay Area will not become a one-horse town, but will retain the mix of culture, criticism, eccentricity, and hard-driving entrepreneurship that has made it so dynamic for so long."

Los Angeles: The Show Must Grow On

Since the beginnings of film, LA has led the world in entertainment. Now, that's creating new opportunities in technology and content as tools change, economic power shifts, and showbiz dramatically evolves.

“We’re going through a renaissance at the moment because of the growth of entertainment and content,” says CBRE vice chairman Jeff Pion, in a Curbed exploration of LA's growth in tech. “There’s a merging of tech and entertainment, and content is king at the moment. The potential for harnessing the existing entertainment workforce in LA immediately is incredible... Five years ago, a founder who wanted to keep their company in LA would get a lot of questions. Today, it’s like, why do I need to be anywhere else?”

Bay Area beasts such as Google and Facebook have bustling offices in Silicon Beach, as well. And SoCal is home to its own thriving breed of tech unicorns. With its deliberate and widely supported efforts to improve mass transit, build more affordable housing, and mitigate the stifling effects of its legendary urban sprawl, LA city is rising to the challenges of changing times. Los Angeles open jobs are more interesting and diverse than ever before.

"LA has had some hard economic times, but there is no doubt that it is an increasingly worldly city with an effervescent artistic and intellectual culture," says Storper. What LA needs is to harness these advantages to better fundamentals: better and denser leadership structures, more connectedness among economic communities, more employment density, better basic education, and a focus on skills."

Golden State of Mind

Los Angeles and San Francisco are both changing landscapes. Creative professionals and business leaders in both cities are defying outmoded stereotypes to nurture new ideas, build new communities, and help determine the futures of the places they love.

There's much more to LA than great food and warm weather. And SF isn't just for hippies and geeks.

Artisan Creative has many years of experience in the San Francisco and Los Angeles markets. We're immersed in their communities, we pay attention to changes, and we see new opportunities as they emerge. Contact us today to start building your own California dream.

We hope you've enjoyed our 515th a.blog.


Using CE to Boost Your CV

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Using CE to Boost Your CV

Technology is changing the world continuously, and the world of business is changing with it. To seize the best creative professional opportunities, it's increasingly necessary to adopt the posture of a lifelong learner. You may choose to go back to school to supplement your education or become an avid and engaged student at the school of life.

As a creative professional, updating your Curriculum Vitae (CV) at regular intervals is a must. Make sure that, when that time comes, you have useful and fascinating things to add. Here are four quick pointers on how to take advantage of an increasing array of opportunities for continuing education.

Get Schooled

Graduate programs, trade schools, and boot camps provide opportunities to immerse yourself in acquiring new knowledge and skills. You can also build your network by working closely and in person with teachers, mentors, and peers. If you have the time, money, and bandwidth to devote to it, this sort of continuing education can supply you with Continuing Education Units (CEUs) or certifications that can enhance your next career advancement.

School Yourself

If you want to save time and money, and you have the self-discipline required for distance learning, the internet provides a rich bounty of opportunities to engage with any subject you can imagine. Skillshare, Teachable, Khan Academy, and LinkedIn Learning are just a few of the platforms that provide substantial continuing education online. Through Coursera, university-level courses are available with the support of many higher learning institutions. Anyone interested in professional growth can easily explore the vast and expanding landscape of modern e-learning.

Participate in Your Community

Classes, networking events, professional associations, and volunteer work opportunities in your area can help you get the lay of the land, find out where your passions intersect with market demands, meet people who can help you find the right opportunities for success, and build your resume, portfolio, and CV. Stay informed, so you have interesting things to say. Look around and ask yourself, "how can I help?" With a positive attitude towards service, you'll establish yourself and build strong alliances soon enough.

Ask Your Creative Recruiter

The benefits of working with creative recruiters include access to resources, inside information, actionable insight, and opportunities for training, testing, skill-building, and peer interaction. At Artisan Creative, we have decades of experience in professional self-actualization, and we know how to help you build a resume and develop the body of work that best suit you. If you want some more oomph in your CV, contact Artisan today.

We hope you've enjoyed the 507th issue of the a.blog.

 


Workplace Trends in 2019

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Workplace Trends in 2019

Every day new talent enters the workforce, with new skills, new experiences, and even new expectations. Various industries will become more diverse, others will hang on as long as they can before they disappear. Innovations in technology will impact our careers and our lives.

A new year brings new changes. Existing currents will strengthen, fade, or continue. Here are five trends that we believe will shape the workplace in 2019 and beyond. These are already in progress.

Emphasis on Purpose, Wellness, and Growth

Surveys of younger workers indicate they feel happier and more accomplished when they work for companies with a sense of purpose, have flexible work schedules and offer continuous learning.

With a greater need for skilled and experienced labor, employers will provide new opportunities for training, upskilling, and mentorship. This will coincide with greater awareness of mental health and the unwavering importance of personal and financial stability. Ideally, these trends will lead toward professional relationships that are more mindful, more respectful, and better built to last. 

Adaptation to AI and Automation

Artificial intelligence and automation will continue to rise. Some occupations will decline, some will become far more powerful, and many people will find themselves partnering with new robotic coworkers. Much workplace activity will involve new training and new priorities to accommodate these new technologies until they become invisible.

Strength In Diversity

Recent controversies in the workplace are reshaping entire industries, making them more welcoming for women, minorities, and others who struggle against discrimination. Creating diverse workplaces and nurturing a culture for all isn't just good karma; it's necessary for doing business. Those who embrace changes and opportunities will help define commerce and culture for the years ahead.

Generation Z Goes to Work

The oldest members of "Gen Z" will turn 23, and many will join the workforce, of which this rising cohort will comprise an estimated 36% by 2020. They will usher in new expectations around technological competence. As Debby Carreau of Inspired HR said, "Even if you're not a member of Gen Z you'll start seeing software strategies, solutions and training trickling into your workplace; because if your organization doesn't offer them, Gen Z will find an employer that will in short order."

Meanwhile, members of older generations will continue to work longer and adapt their wisdom and experience to new circumstances. Chip Conley outlines this beautifully in his article calling himself a mentern (a mentor and an intern simultaneously).

Thus, we come back to the power of communication. If you are the sort of person who knows how to help the members of these different groups better communicate and more effectively work together, you will reap significant dividends in the years to come.

Change is the only constant. At Artisan Creative, we have years of experience in helping creative professionals and organizations thrive in times of change. Contact us today to learn more.

We hope you've enjoyed the 505th issue of our a.blog. 


Job Search Best Practices in 2019

Wednesday, January 09, 2019

Job Search Best Practices in 2019

The beginning of a new year is a time to try new things, spruce up your perspective, and take stock of the opportunities in front of you. As a creative professional, you can take this cue to get serious about your job hunt. You'll increase your odds of success when you act mindfully and deliberately and know clearly what you're going to accomplish.

Whether you're angling to rejoin the workforce, looking for a new role that better matches your goals, or simply want to keep your job-search skills sharper, here are some best practices that will give you an edge and help you find work you'll love.

Know What You Want

Before you begin your search, take the time to form a clear vision of the job you'd most want to have, with the company that best aligns with your objectives and values. Then, you'll have clear guidelines on the sorts of opportunities you're best suited for, and that best suit you in return. Spend an hour or two to tailor your resume, write a passionate cover letter, and complete a thoughtful job application for an opportunity you really want; it’s worth the time rather than many more hours of applying for jobs at random.

Specificity Kills Ambiguity

Be specific about your skills, write out what you've achieved, and how you hope to grow in the future. When you crystallize your goals and can see them in detail, you'll find your job search gets more efficient when you explore the right niches. Collaborate with a creative recruiter to narrow down your job hunt and save yourself a lot of effort, time, and uncertainty.

Handle Your SEO

As part of cultivating the professional image you want to project, it's increasingly essential that you pay close attention to how you appear on social media and the web. Make sure your digital portfolio and any associated sites are up-to-date and portray you in the way you want to be seen by recruiters, hiring managers, and others in your industry. Plan to get professional mileage from your social media channels, particularly LinkedIn, or lock down personal accounts if you don't want them to be seen by curious strangers.

Work Your Network

The beginning of the year is a fine time to check in with your contacts. It's easy to let your mentors and peers know you acknowledge and appreciate them. A quick note can pay massive dividends throughout the year. If you're feeling lonesome, schedule some networking events. Commit to expanding your horizons and put yourself out there. A small interpersonal risk can go a long way.

Be the Best Version of Yourself

Getting specific, helps you appreciate the talents and skills that set you apart from the rest. Eliminate jargon and buzzwords from your resume and focus on ways in which you really stand out. Regard yourself as a brand and zoom in on the aspects that differentiate you from others. Learn from your experiences, emphasize your strengths, work on your weaknesses, and approach your job search from a spirit of optimism. When you're unique, there's no competition.

At Artisan Creative, we have decades of experiences in connecting creative professionals with the opportunities that help them soar. Take advantage of this season of renewal. Contact us today to get your 2019 off on the right foot and get the support you need to thrive through the year and throughout your career.

We hope you've enjoyed the 504th issue of the a.blog.

 


Our Top 25 Blogs

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Our Top 25 Blogs

We are thrilled to publish our 500th blog today. As we approach the end of 2018, we’d like to share some of our a.team’s favorite blogs.

These cover a range of topics from self-development and time-management to job search, hiring and much more.

We hope you enjoy this top 25 greatest hits compilation.

We hope you've enjoyed our 500th post.  You can find plenty other tips, inspirations, best practices and advice on our a.blog.

We look forward to connecting.




Find Your Passion

Wednesday, November 07, 2018

Find Your Passion

#ArtisanAdvice -Find Your Passion 

Joni is a self-taught designer with a natural curiosity and gung-ho attitude toward picking up new hobbies and monetizing passions. In several years she has launched a food blog, a granola company, became a certified holistic health coach, and launched a baked goods and flower collective. We spoke to her to find out how she went from public health and art major to successful designer without any formal design training.

Joni began playing around with the idea of a design career after graduating from Berkeley. She studied design tutorials via CDs (remember those days?) and YouTube. She loved learning and figured she had a good shot of doing design full-time. This is when Craigslist was a hotbed of job postings for kickstarting careers and Joni landed a full-time role at a design studio where she cut her teeth on the whole gamut of the design process. So what should you do if you find yourself in a similar situation? And where should you even begin?

With literally thousands of hobbies out there it can be tough to know where to even begin to find your passion. Try to be curious about everything around you and find things to do outside of work. Joni likes to be active and pack in as many activities as she can. “When you get to a certain point [in your career] there’s always a way to make it more legitimate. I tried to monetize a lot of hobbies and quickly realized some should always stay as exactly that -- just hobbies.” When it comes to design, Adobe is great about providing free tutorials. And remember, you don’t have to be the best but as long as you’re scratching the itch that’s all that matters at the start.

Give Yourself a Creative Outlet

Joni worked hard at giving herself a broad skill-set, “You don’t want to be one dimensional when you work in the creative industry. It’s important to have additional places to be creative outside of your job.” In Joni’s case, she loves interacting with people and learning about new topics and industries-- be it a blog or sketchbook, find a creative avenue and see where it takes you.

Nurture Relationships

So you’ve reached the point where you’ve found your passion, you’ve got the skills so now what? Work won’t find its way to you without you putting yourself out there. “I’ve always been successful with word-of-mouth business. Friends’ businesses or friends of friends are referred to me and as long as your social network knows what you do and what you’re interested in, people will come to you.” No doubt there will be times when you are pushed out of your comfort zone and here’s when you have to fake it until you make it. It’s a cliché term, but when it comes to gaining confidence it truly works. And what if you’re nervous about putting your work out there? Don’t be, Joni reassures, “The moment you get over your shyness about showing work it opens so many doors. Take your ego out of criticism and people will come to you to seek your services."

 

We hope you've enjoyed the 495th issue of our a.blog.

 



Creepin’ It Real: Scary Job Interviews From Our Recruiters

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Creepin’ It Real: Scary Job Interviews From Our Recruiters

We've all been there. We turn up late to an interview because of that pesky LA traffic. Maybe you meet your interviewer who is looking dashing in a suit and you're wearing jeans, or worse, shorts. Did you fail to do your research and you're horrifyingly unprepared to answer questions on the company?

Job hunting can be terrifying. We get that. And we all have at least one frightening interview we’ve endured. Our recruiters have lived to tell the tale of their early career interviews and they're sharing their horror stories with you this Halloween. Avoid any bone-chilling experiences at your next interview by learning from their mistakes.

Dressed to Depress

“On my first day of interviews to enter recruiting I had two back-to-back interviews: a corporate recruitment firm followed by a digital agency. My recruiter only prepared me for the first interview, not the second. The first interview took place in a private members-only bar, so of course, I was dressed to impress. I went straight to my second interview wearing a suit only to arrive at an edgy agency surrounded by people in casual, trendy clothes. There was nothing more humiliating than being marched through the office with everyone staring at my formal attire. The interviewer (wearing jeans) asked why I was dressed in such a way – I did explain myself and felt incredibly uncomfortable.” – Laura Pell – Recruiter at Artisan Creative

It’s important to do your own research on office environments. To get a better sense of a company’s culture and employees, look at their social pages, read up on their core values and look up their Glassdoor reviews. Look online for company events to gauge what to wear. Remember, in an interview, it’s always better to dress up than dress down -- make sure you’re well-groomed and presentable.

Scary Requests

”I once interviewed for a company specializing in hypoallergenic products. The job description clearly stated no strong perfumes so I made sure to skip my usual spritz that day. When I arrived, they had me sit face to face with the main interviewer while an associate sat in the chair right next to me and proceeded to lean in and take a few deep breaths. She continued to do that for the next few minutes and then asked if I was wearing deodorant. I said yes and apparently, the deodorant scent was too strong for their liking. I guess for this role, it wasn't enough to look the part, you have to smell the part as well!” – Jen Huynh – Recruiter at Artisan Creative

This request is uncommon and while we hope you won’t have to endure being sniffed at by interviewers, do heed any requests client’s make. They may ask you to fill in application forms, present portfolios or take a skills test. If you come unprepared, first impressions of your organizational skills will be duly noted.

We’d love to hear your interview horror stories. Do you have your own frightful story to share?

 

We hope you've enjoyed the 495th issue of our a.blog.  Happy Halloween! 

 


Resume Refresh Checklist

Thursday, October 04, 2018

Resume Refresh Checklist

Are you starting a new job search? Could your ongoing search use an energy boost? Have trends in your industry shifted? Have you accomplished those professional goals you committed to at the start of this year?

If you answered yes to some or all of the above, it could be a good time for you to review your resume to give it a quick update and polish.

For most recruiters, hiring managers, or connectors who find you through a LinkedIn search, your Linkedin Bio and resume will be your best chance to make a first impression. You will approach the job market with more confidence if you’re sure your resume is as strong and polished as it can be.

Have a look now at your resume to make sure it meets all the important criteria.

Is it fresh?

If you haven’t spent any time on it in more than a few months, it pays to give your resume a close read, especially if you’re actively sending it out. You may be able to improve some awkward phrasing, use more modern formatting, or even catch a stray typo. Grammarly and Hemingway are two popular and trusted tools you can use to improve and tighten your writing.

Is it current?

Clearly, if you change jobs or achieve new professional goals, you should update your resume to reflect the new you. You must also be mindful of changing trends and language in your industry. Any expert who reads it should know that you know your stuff. With the rise of applicant tracking software, exceptionally strong SEO is one of your best friends during a job search. You are your own marketing department, so familiarize yourself with the latest SEO tricks and techniques that marketers use to boost visibility. Also, read job descriptions for jobs you want and rework your resume to use similar keywords. Make yourself easy to find.

Is it exciting?

Write in the active voice to present a stronger sense of who you are and what it might be like to work with you. Rather than “responsibilities” or “duties,” focus on your accomplishments and how you provide value and ROI. Rather than your “objective,” be descriptive – every line should be lush with details about what you know, what you can do, and what makes you different. Grab your reader’s attention and lodge in their memory.

Is it on brand?

Your resume works in concert with your social media profiles, your online portfolio, and the rest of your overall digital presentation. Make sure they all present a consistent sense of your personality, your professional values, and your realms of expertise. Create a buyer persona to represent the hiring manager whose attention you want to attract, and redesign all aspects of your digital presence to communicate directly with that person.

Is the design appropriate?

Always emphasize content over form. Every element of your resume should add; none should distract. Unless you are a visual designer with a distinctive aesthetic, stick with common typefaces and simple formatting. Trends in aesthetics and language change rapidly; present yourself in a manner that will have perennial appeal. If you’re in doubt, find a mentor or a peer you respect and ask if you can use that person’s resume as a model for your own.

At Artisan Creative, we know that building your dream career isn’t just about attention to detail – it’s about knowing which details matter.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 491st issue of our a.blog. Get in touch today and continue the conversation.


The Power of Mental Representations

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

The Power of Mental Representations

As a child, you were an adept and effortless daydreamer, immersing yourself in your imaginary experiences with the dedication and enthusiasm of a film director. The richness of your inner experiences could rival that of real life. The skills associated with making mental representations of imaginary experiences tends to fade with age, and if you deliberately cultivate them, they can help you make more mindful and deliberate decisions to change the course of your career.

In a piece for Aeon, the philosophy professor Armin W. Schultz ponders what evolutionary purposes our mental representations might serve. Inner movies, he writes, "allow the organism to reason about what the right thing to do is. Very often, organisms that rely on a system of reflexes to manage their interactions with the world have to cope with much redundancy. Many perceptions of the world call for the same behavioral response, and many behavioral responses to the world are variations on a theme." If you can learn to think outside the restrictions of your unconscious reflexes, you can open new possibilities your reptilian brain didn't know you had.

Here are a few ways to use these skills to your professional advantage.

Make a Mental Movie

"Let’s say you are offered a new job in a different city, and you need to figure out whether to accept it," Arvin writes. "How are you going to do this? Most likely, you will think about what the job offer means to you: what will the new city be like? How fulfilling will the new job be? What about the pay and other benefits? How does all of this compare with where you live and work now? It’s not trivial, in the end, you’ll manage to make up your mind."

Experience, in your mind, the details of a typical day on the job, how your life and mindset will shift because of it, and what your work and your achievements will mean to you, intellectually and emotionally.

Running elaborate mental simulations of possible future experiences - taking it three-dimensional - can give your gut more information to work with. Sometimes, you may end up "going with your gut" in the end, even after all the rumination. Which is still a good exercise to have gone through.

Try Different Models

There is much wisdom to be found in consciously adopting certain intellectual frameworks, and then shopping around until you find one that is particularly useful to you.

When working through a difficult decision, experiment with a range of possible scenarios, based on different variables. You can then make a more wholly informed decision, and prepare yourself for different realities that may present themselves.

Try different sensory modalities, as well. If you are not a visual thinker and you are more comfortable focusing on sounds and feelings, try hearing or feeling your way through a decision. You may get some fresh insight just from imagining the physical sensations walking through your new office space.

Don't Mistake the Map for the Territory

Our mental representations never square precisely with reality. For difficult questions about your career, sometimes the most powerful answer is "I don't know." Then actively seek out “to know”.

When you work with mental representations, acknowledge that your thinking is biased by factors both conscious and unconscious. Do plenty of research and always keep your mind open to new information. Mental representations empower us to anticipate change, including change we never could have expected.

With the rise of AR and VR technologies, we may soon be able to work with simulations that are even more rich and useful. Be prepared to keep dreaming bigger and better.

At Artisan Creative, we love to share all the tools that can empower you to have the career and the life you want. 

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed the 484th issue of our a.blog.  Get in touch today to continue the conversation.

 



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